Dissertation (Masters) Economic Implications of Alternative Sites of Death and Sites of Care in Ontario Palliative Care Recipients

Author

Mo Yu

Abstract

ntroduction: This study compared societal costs of care between two settings of palliative care delivery and death (home versus hospital) in an integrated palliative care program in Toronto.

Methods: 186 terminal cancer patients participated in the study. Total societal cost of end-of-life care was compared between patients who died in the home and patients who died in the hospital. Total societal cost of end-of-life care was modeled as a function of the number of days the patients spent at home during the palliative trajectory.

Results: There was no statistically significant difference in total cost of end-of-life care between home death and hospital death patients (p>0.05). Furthermore, an additional day the patient spent at home led to a significant increase in the total cost of end-of-life care (plessthan0.05).

Conclusion: The results demonstrated that from a societal perspective, providing palliative care under an integrated palliative care program at home may be just as expensive (if not more expensive) as caring for them in the hospital.


Supervisor

Peter C. Coyte